11th August 2019 Not Happy Birthday.

Goodaye all, thanks to my youngest daughter for help with airline bookings and our Rod Pilon Tpt Melbourne manager, I was able to attend my sisters’ funeral in Townsville, Tuesday. It was a long day getting back into Melbourne depot near midnight, but I was glad to be able to attend. My sister passed away after a diabetes attack, she had been dealing with it for some years, but was a no nonsense, live life woman. We had not had much time together as children, but I did get to visit with her and some of her family last trip to Townsville some months ago. They came out and picked me up, took me home for tea and a shower and I am glad I got to see her then. Sadly missed and too early departed, Love you Gayle.

I am trying to keep up with the HVNL review, paper 3 response lodged and working on 4 due at the end of this month. Safe People and Practices another 67 pages, asks some hard questions. What does the current HVNL do well, little from a drivers point of view, but it is not simple to explain. I am trying and I hear the cynicism of many drivers who have done so before, and nothing changed. Do I hope they will listen, yes, but there needs to be more voices telling them the problems and offering solutions.

The following should be read by those here who want Electronic Work Diaries here in Australia.

Dave Heller, vice president, legislative affairs, Truckload Carriers Association, speaks to The Machinery Haulers Association at its annual meeting in Fontana, Wisconsin, on July 25, 2019.
To begin with, Heller notde that love them or hate them, electronic logging devices (ELDs) are providing the trucking industry with massive amounts of real-time data about how trucks operate and how truck drivers spend their days. This data, Heller said, is now highlighting – with hard information – the need for more flexible Hours of Service rules, highlighting an “epidemic” in unsafe driving caused by smartphones as well as detention time issues and other industry problems.
“ELDs were never going to make you safer,” Heller told attendees at the conference, adding that a Northwestern University study found that accidents have not decreased as a result of the ELD Mandate, which went into effect last year. “They are a compliance tool. It is the Hours of Service which will help make your operations safer. That’s because the data they provide can be used to shape better regulations in the future.”

Those who think EWDs will stop crashes and that we can be micro-managed by those who do not have to do the job, should take serious note. Detention times were to be legislated to be paid in the USA, but the bill didn’t get up. Who do you think stopped it, not truckers, that’s for sure. The need for “FLEXIBLE” hours of service, and this not by a driver, means some are listening to drivers there, but they may well have put the cart before the horse.

Without flexible rules, rest areas where and when and the size and facilities needed, how do we manage our fatigue? The logbook will not do it for you and if you get it wrong, the penalties far outweigh the road safety risk in the majority of minor breaches, yet the cost to defend yourself can exceed the fine and the authorities know and abuse this from my point of view.

We need a fair and cheap review panel for breaches and that could well see us get a fair justice system for truckies. That is not what we have now. Safe Travelling, Rod Hannifey.

5th August 2019, sadness and safety.

Goodaye all. I am currently in Melbourne and fly out to my sisters funeral in Townsville in the morning and need some more sleep, so will try to be succinct. So much to say and so little time, but then how do we as truckies get heard by the mainstream public? I have said the aim of the TIV was to put a different face forward than we usually get in front of the public. When there is a crash, generally it is announced as a truck crash, not a crash involving a truck, so we are all too often deemed guilty by default.

If I were involved in a crash, found to have taken drugs, killed someone (whether my fault or not, I would most often initially be blamed anyway) I would be on all the media for the wrong reasons. Yet when I have a truck that promotes the industry and road safety, a working truck, not a show pony, I still can’t get anywhere near the exposure and traction I would like to.

I got an email about a survey on dash-cam footage. I filled it in and have responded directly to the researcher, saying it seemed very negative, nearly saying the only reason for putting up dash-cam footage, was to shame or lambast someone else and in doing so, the person putting it up, sought some higher position or their view was the only one.

I do not know about worldwide, but my understanding is the first dash-cam, at least in Australia was put together by a truckie. It was done because he was sick of telling people what stupid things car drivers did in front of trucks and no one would believe him, so he looked for, sourced components and came up with the idea and I had one from him, very early on.

Many years ago when it was first spoken of, I did three different spots on TV current affairs shows and they were generally positive. Now of course they are everywhere and have been taken to the next level in many fleets of not just watching the traffic outside, but the driver as well and I do have a problem with that, when I live in the truck up to 6 days a week. More of those who don’t have to do, telling those who do, how to do it!

I still believe that there is a real value in showing mistakes made by drivers who do not understand sharing the road with trucks, to save the lives of others. Not all truckies are perfect either, we too are human, but we go to work and want to get home safely each trip. Now you would say, doesn’t everyone?
If that was what we were all thinking as we drove, perhaps we would all be safer on the road. Instead of this, it seems many forget, think it will never happen to them, or think, they own the road and everyone else should get out of the way. Or do they simply not think of anything except getting in front of the next car, or saving two seconds on their trip?

I will ask you all and go to bed.

When you are behind the wheel, do you think of safety, yours and or all others you are sharing the road with? Do you think other drivers do? Or do you just think of other things? How do we focus people’s attentions on the road and of course, we cannot put mind control in place to do so for every second someone is behind the wheel, or should we go that far to save lives? Safe Travelling, Rod Hannifey.